The Better Half of the Teacher’s Pet

Claire Stromseth, Sentry Reporter

A large portion of our student body has been subjected to pet stories from teachers who may rather have a classroom filled with animals opposed to kids. From talking to these very teachers, it is evident that there is validity behind their passion. 

While every animal has its share of cuteness in both appearance and background stories, some are seemingly higher on the scale of charisma. The first pet that caught my eye was Marley, math teacher Daniela Sava’s dog. 

“He is a Hungarian sheep dog. The breed is called Puli. It is a very rare breed in the United States, probably under a thousand dogs like that, but very common in Europe…. He’s in association with Bob Marley of course, because his hair is corded, so he has cords like Bob Marley,” Sava said. 

Not only does this Puli have the same name as Bob Marley, but his youthful spirit seems to match the artist’s magnetism.

“Doesn’t matter how old he is, he’s almost twelve years old, he still acts like a puppy. He’s very energetic and very protective. He loves humans probably more than he loves other dogs,” Sava said.

Next up is Lucy, a dog that was originally the foster pet of one of The Sentry’s very own copy editors,  Zoe Foose. English teacher Alec Hicks recounts how the Great Pyrenees mix became a part of his family. 

“So I taught Zoe and Rowan Foose in eighth grade and they were always fostering dogs. For years she would always come and tell me when she had a new litter. Finally one day Rowan came up and said you have to see these two dogs. The moment I saw them both I knew I had to get one for the family, it was like our little Christmas present,” Hicks said.

While this heartwarming full-circle moment is hard to follow, another member of our staff, Ella-Claire Sadauskas, whose mother is a teacher at our school, has a family that has more animal members than humans. English teacher Rachel Sadauskas lists the members that make up her zoo.

“We have two cavapoos, we have a bearded dragon [a desert reptile], we have a crested gecko and we have a hamster,” Sadauskas said.

Not only is it a full house, it is also a creative one. Sadauskas credits the unique naming of each pet to her career in literature. 

“The cavapoos are Atticus and Frenchy and then our bearded dragon is Buckbeak. Squishy is the crested gecko and Bellatrix is the hamster,” Sadauskas said.

Last but not least, History teacher Emily Miranda has a story that is just as adorable as her dog, Lincoln.

“My husband is a football coach at [Washington and Liberty] and my birthday is in September which means I don’t see him that much in the fall, so for my birthday six or seven years ago, he got me Lincoln to keep me company during football season,” Miranda said. 

Whether it be the earnestly heartfelt unifications or adoring looks, our school’s teachers have overwhelmingly lovely companions.